The Ghost at the Wedding

The young men who worked in the cane fields of northern New south Wales in 1914 couldn’t wait to set off for the adventure of war. The women coped as best they could, raised the children and lived in fear of an official telegram. They grieved for those killed, and learnt of worse things than death in combat. The Ghost of the Wedding chronicles events from both sides of war: the horror of the battlefields and the women left at home. Walker’s depictions of those are grittily accurate, their reverberations haunting.

The Colony: A History of Early Sydney

The Colony is the story of the marvellously contrary, endlessly energetic early years of Sydney. It is an intimate account of the transformation of a campsite in a beautiful cove to the town that later became Australia's largest and best-known city....

Strange Places: A Memoir of Mental Illness

A darkly humorous, insightful and searingly honest first-hand account of a journey through schizophrenia from a prodigiously talented writer....

The Water Dreamers

The Water Dreamers is an illuminating account of the ways people have imagined and interpreted Australia while struggling to understand this continent and striving to conquer its obstacles. It’s an environmental history and a cultural history with an unmistakable sense of how, today, we are part of that continuing story.

The Blue Plateau: A Landscape Memoir

'A truly beautiful book, exquisite as the country it depicts' PATRICE NEWELL, author of Ten Thousand Acres An inspired meditation on the contours of the land and its people, of time and place and family, the rhythms of nature and the rhythms of friendship, it is a book of many belongings. Here you will meet the plateau's first people; you will meet Les and Henryk and Jim; you will walk the Kedumba and the Kanimbla in drought and fire and flood. Evocative and deeply moving, The Blue Plateau is a poet's story of an astonishing place and a loving portrait of home.

The Life and Death of Democracy

The Life and Death of Democracy will inspire and shock its readers. Presenting the first grand history of democracy for well over a century, it poses along the way some tough and timely questions: how did democratic ideals and institutions come to have the shape they do today? Given all the recent fanfare about democracy promotion, why are many people now gripped by the feeling that a bad moon is rising over all the world's democracies? Do they indeed have a future? Or is perhaps democracy fated to melt away, along with our polar ice caps?...

House of Exile: The Life and Times of Heinrich Mann and Nellie Kroeger-Mann

In 1933 the author and activist Heinrich Mann and his partner Nelly Kroeger fled Nazi Germany, finding refuge first in the south of France and later, in great despair, in Los Angeles, where Nelly committed suicide in 1944 and Heinrich died in 1950....

The Tall Man

The story of a death, a policeman, an island and a country. The Tall Man is the story of Palm Island, the tropical paradise where one morning Cameron Doomadgee swore at a policeman and forty minutes later lay dead in a watch-house cell. It is the story of that policeman, the tall, enigmatic Christopher Hurley who chose to work in some of the toughest and wildest places in Australia, and of the struggle to bring him to trial. Above all, it is a story in luminous detail of two worlds clashing – and a haunting moral puzzle that no reader will forget.

Drawing the Global Colour Line

At last a history of Australia in its dynamic global context. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, in response to the mobilisation and mobility of colonial and coloured peoples around the world, self-styled 'white men's countries' in South Africa, North America and Australasia worked in solidarity to exclude those peoples they defined as not-white--including Africans, Chinese, Indians, Japanese and Pacific Islanders. Their policies provoked in turn a long international struggle for racial equality....

Gough Whitlam: A Moment in History

Acclaimed biographer Jenny Hocking's Gough Whitlam: A Moment in History is the first contemporary and definitive biographical study of the former Labor Prime Minister. From his childhood in the fledging city of Canberra to his first appearance as Prime Minister to his extensive war service in the Pacific and marriage to Margaret, the champion swimmer and daughter of Justice Wilfred Dovey, the biography draws on previously unseen archival material, extensive interviews with family and colleagues, and exclusive interviews with Gough Whitlam himself....

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