Exhibits of the Sun

About the book

Exhibits of the Sun is Stephen Edgar's tenth collection of poems. This book displays the great range of his work, which marries technique with powerful emotion and intellect. With a mastery of rhyme, Edgar's poetry embraces the natural world, and encourages the reader to open their eyes to a universe that physicists are starting to realise is becoming more beautiful and complex as it expands.

Towards the Equator: New & Selected Poems

About the book

A substantial volume of poetry by Alex Skovron spanning some thirty years of writing, it opens with the book-length new collection Towards the Equator, then continues with poems selected from his five previous collections, book by book, from The Rearrangement (1988) to the prose-poems of Autographs(2008). The poetry encompasses a broad range of interests, concerns, styles and techniques. Among the poetry's preoccupations are time, history and memory; music and art, faith and philosophy; the creative impulse and the erotic; and the quest after self-knowledge.

Earth Hour

About the book

In this full volume of poetry, David Malouf once again shows us why he is one of Australia's most respected writers. David Malouf's new collection comes to rest at the perfect, still moment of 'silence, following talk' after its exploration of memory, imagination and mortality. With elegance and wit, these poems move from profound depths to whimsy and playfulness. As Malouf interweaves light and dark, levity and gravity, he offers a vision of life on 'this patch of earth and its green things', charting the resilience of beauty amidst stubborn human grace.

Devadatta's Poems

About the book

Devadatta's Poems complement the sequence Between the Palace and the Bodhi Tree, published in Beveridge's earlier collection Wolf Notes, which followed the travels of Siddhattha Gotama before he became the Buddha. These poems are written from the viewpoint of Devadatta, Siddhattha's jealous and ambitious cousin, who attempted to murder him three times. They are marked by extraordinary richness of language and detail, and a dedication to sensation.

Poems 1957–2013

About the book

This substantial volume, Poems 1957–2013, contains all of the poetry written by Geoffrey Lehmann considered by the poet to be worthy of inclusion. He has taken the prerogative of the mature artist looking back to revise poems, sometimes substantially, and to restore lines and passages he had removed from earlier versions. Displaying the breadth and depth of his poetry, Lehmann explores human nature in settings as diverse as ancient Rome and rural New South Wales, from searing satire to the domestic life of a family.

The Ladder

About the book

The Ladder is Simon West's third collection of poetry, and his first in four years. Many earlier preoccupations return—the natural environment, Italian art and the dimensions of place. There is a new focus on worldly and artistic responsibility and a fascination with the certain poise of being in between. At the collection's heart are the building blocks of language, along with the more literal ones of Rome, where some of these poems were written during a residency at the Whiting studio in 2012.

Waiting for the Past

About the book

The new volume of poems by Les Murray AO—his first in five years—continues his use of molten language. From 'The Black Beaches' to 'Radiant Pleats, Mulgoa', from 'High Speed Trap Space' to '1960 Brought the Electric', this is verse that renews and transforms our sense of the world. In the words of Clive James: “No poet has ever travelled like this, whether in reality or simply in mind. Seeing the shape or hearing the sound of one thing in another, he finds forms.”

The Hazards

About the book

Charged with fierce imagination and swift lyricism, Holland-Batt’s cosmopolitan poems reflect a predatory world rife with hazards both real and imagined. Opening with a vision of a leveret’s agonising death by myxomatosis and closing with a lover disappearing into dangerous waters, this collection careens through diverse geographical territory—from haunted post-colonial landscapes in Australia to brutal animal hierarchies in the cloud forests of Nicaragua. Engaging everywhere with questions of violence and loss, erasure and extinction, The Hazards inhabits unsettling terrain, unafraid to...

Cocky’s Joy

About the book

Michael Farrell was born and raised in rural NSW and as the title Cocky’s Joy suggests, many of the poems in this collection are rooted in the bush, which they present as connected to the rest of the world in magical and often hilarious ways. Farrell’s experimentalism doesn’t prevent him from offering moving tributes, to women and lovers, and to scenes recalled from the past. In fact, it is precisely his eye for metaphor and the unexpected combination, for punning and the letter—in both its verbal and visual aspects—that gives his poetry its humour and energy.

Net Needle

About the book

Net Needle is the new collection of poems from Robert Adamson—Australia’s foremost lyric poet. David Wheatley, from the TLS (Times Literary Supplement) describes Net Needle as ‘one of the finest Australian poets at work today’. He has avidly followed Bob Adamson’s work since his early days, as he has probed the inner and outer landscapes of his environment with inspirited precision.
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