Chains of Snow

About the book

Jakob Zigura’s poetry is born out of that high style of address where intellect and scholarship meet demanding form and produce feeling. He moves through both time and space, from the ancient philosophers through to contemporary observation. He is an elegant and authoritative poet. ‘What will suffice’ begins one poem, quoting Wallace Stevens, ‘will, finally, not suffice; unless a puddle with a petrol spill / suffice to read the gestures of the wind.’ These gestures involve a straight back and firm steps. The halls resound, the petrol spills, and, as Emily Dickinson put it, ‘a formal feeling...

Tempo

About the book

Time and motion are undercurrents in these new poems by Sarah Day. Her subjects encompass the commonplace in the Australian landscape: the remnant beak of a raven, tree shadows in urban streets, industrial cranes and mowing-machines, as well as the exotic or peculiar: the world seed bank in Norway, artefacts in Pompeii, Graeco-Egyptian funeral portraits, the landscape paintings of John Glover, the Earth as seen from elsewhere in the Milky Way. These poems, individually and collectively, invite questions about the enigmatic nature of past, present and future.

Eldershaw

About the book

A children’s game in an overgrown garden is the first hint of a troubling presence in the old house ‘Eldershaw’. But is the haunting a memory of the past inscribed in the stonework or a discord the occupants have brought with them? Eldershaw is a brilliant piece of ‘uncanny’ fiction… alive and convincing at every point, crackling with engagement and intensity. Martin Duwell, Australian Poetry Review [A] wonderful love poem and elegy… [of] almost unbearable poignancy. The final dateless narrative, ‘The Pool’, is a high point of Australian poetry. Geoffrey Lehmann, The Weekend Australian

1953

About the book

1953 is a unique verse narrative composed of monologues and verse portraits. Together, these build towards the story of an Australian town, Eurandangee, and its people on a particular summer’s day in the 1950s. The poems reflect the perspective of a number of the town’s residents. Rumbling beneath this is the broader examination of a developing post-war Australia, with issues of the lingering effects of war and violence and an accumulation of cultural change....

Exhibits of the Sun

About the book

Exhibits of the Sun is Stephen Edgar's tenth collection of poems. This book displays the great range of his work, which marries technique with powerful emotion and intellect. With a mastery of rhyme, Edgar's poetry embraces the natural world, and encourages the reader to open their eyes to a universe that physicists are starting to realise is becoming more beautiful and complex as it expands.

Towards the Equator: New & Selected Poems

About the book

A substantial volume of poetry by Alex Skovron spanning some thirty years of writing, it opens with the book-length new collection Towards the Equator, then continues with poems selected from his five previous collections, book by book, from The Rearrangement (1988) to the prose-poems of Autographs(2008). The poetry encompasses a broad range of interests, concerns, styles and techniques. Among the poetry's preoccupations are time, history and memory; music and art, faith and philosophy; the creative impulse and the erotic; and the quest after self-knowledge.

Earth Hour

About the book

In this full volume of poetry, David Malouf once again shows us why he is one of Australia's most respected writers. David Malouf's new collection comes to rest at the perfect, still moment of 'silence, following talk' after its exploration of memory, imagination and mortality. With elegance and wit, these poems move from profound depths to whimsy and playfulness. As Malouf interweaves light and dark, levity and gravity, he offers a vision of life on 'this patch of earth and its green things', charting the resilience of beauty amidst stubborn human grace.

Devadatta's Poems

About the book

Devadatta's Poems complement the sequence Between the Palace and the Bodhi Tree, published in Beveridge's earlier collection Wolf Notes, which followed the travels of Siddhattha Gotama before he became the Buddha. These poems are written from the viewpoint of Devadatta, Siddhattha's jealous and ambitious cousin, who attempted to murder him three times. They are marked by extraordinary richness of language and detail, and a dedication to sensation.

Poems 1957–2013

About the book

This substantial volume, Poems 1957–2013, contains all of the poetry written by Geoffrey Lehmann considered by the poet to be worthy of inclusion. He has taken the prerogative of the mature artist looking back to revise poems, sometimes substantially, and to restore lines and passages he had removed from earlier versions. Displaying the breadth and depth of his poetry, Lehmann explores human nature in settings as diverse as ancient Rome and rural New South Wales, from searing satire to the domestic life of a family.
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