The 200 weavers and painters who are members of Injalak Arts Centre in Gunbalanya (West Arnhem Land) are Kunwinjku, Mengerrdji and Erre people, all of whom today speak the Kinwinjku language. Injalak Arts Centre opened in 1989 providing opportunities to artists from Kakadu National Park in the west, to the 'stone country' of the upper Liverpool and Mann Rivers in the east. Gunbalanya is home to one of the most important rock art areas in the world. It is from this rock art, as well as ceremonial body and objects designs and paintings on the walls of wet season bark shelters, that the art of Injalak artists finds it origins.

Four artists will represent Injalak Arts at the Festival of Pacific Arts.

Jonah Djumburri is a clever and skilled painter, hunter and land management ranger. His country lies in central eastern Arnhemland, Rembarrnga country. Jonah works and collects different mediums including Bark,Paper and Didjeridu.

Kevin Gameraidj is a humble character, growing up on Croker Island then moving to Gunbalanya to go to school. Kevin learned how to paint on paper and bark by watching senior artist's at Injalak Arts. Kevin enjoyed visiting his country at Marrkolidjban when he was young and learn't about hunting and the many stories about his country. He likes to paint stories from his country. When he paints his dreaming 'Namorrorddo-Crippled man dreaming sometimes he feels sorry or sick for that story.

Lynne Nadjowh is known for boldly designed pandanus weavings and consummate paintings on bark and paper. Her baskets are characterised by bold blocks of colour and intricate figurative plant motifs. She also experiments with bark paintings with openwork coiled pandanus frames, a form unique to the Gunbalanya region.

Selina Nadjowh is an accomplished weaver and painter, known for delicate and finely balanced compositions and the formal beauty of her work. Screen printed fabrics and t-shirts carrying her designs are the top selling fabric products at Injalak Arts.