Public engagement sessions will take place at 38 locations across the country.

Detail of Tjulpu Kirrkingpa (Bird Family) by Erica Ikungka Shorty from Warakurna WA. 2022. Image by Genevieve Harold. Copyright Tjanpi Desert Weavers, NPY Women’s Council.
Detail of Tjulpu Kirrkingpa (Bird Family) by Erica Ikungka Shorty from Warakurna WA. 2022. Image by Genevieve Harold. Copyright Tjanpi Desert Weavers, NPY Women’s Council.

The Australian Government is seeking the views of communities and organisations across the country to inform the development of new laws to address the harm caused by fake art, merchandise and souvenirs.

Under the National Cultural Policy, Revive, the government has committed to introduce stand-alone legislation for Indigenous cultural and intellectual property, also referred to as traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions.

More than half of all purchased merchandise and souvenirs with First Nations art and designs are inauthentic or are made without permission from Traditional Owners, according to the Productivity Commission.

The legislation will be developed through a First Nations-led process, with any solution to be informed by—and address the needs of—First Nations peoples.

Public engagement sessions will take place over 10 weeks beginning 4 March 2024. Three additional online sessions will be held in June, and written submissions will also be accepted through our Have your say page until 15 June 2024.

Community engagement will be underpinned by a formalised partnership between the Australian Government and First Nations people, including the appointment of an Expert Working Group comprising First Nations representatives, appointed by the Office of the Arts. Expressions of Interest to become a member of the Expert Working Group will open in May.

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